Information Obesity: The web site

Bibliography

NOTE: We have provided links to online versions of as many of these papers as we could easily find. Two provisos need stating here, however. First that this is, inevitably, incomplete and over time many of these will turn into "dead links". If you tell us about them (use the "Contacts" page or the discussion forum) we will try to keep them updated but no Web link is ever completely guaranteed.

Secondly, you may need IDs and passwords to access some of these papers. If you are a member of an academic institution (student or teacher) these should be provided to you as a matter of course, but not every institution will subscribe to every journal or other online service and it may be that for you, some of these papers are simply inaccessible. On the other hand, alternative means of accessing these exist: try something radical, for example, like actually going into the library (remember, it's that big building with the books in) and/or speaking to your friendly librarian...

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  • ACRL [Association of College and Research Libraries] (2000): Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education. http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/index.cfm [last accessed March 2009]
  • ALA [American Library Association] (1989): ALA Presidential Committee on Information Literacy. http://www.ala.org/ [last accessed March 2009]
  • Andretta, S. (2007): Information Literacy: A Practitioner’s Guide, Oxford: Chandos.
  • Apple, M. W. (1982): “Curriculum and the Labour Process: The Logic of Technical Control”, Social Text 5, 108-125.
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  • Argyris, C. (1999): On Organizational Learning, Oxford: Blackwell.
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  • Bell, D. (1976): The Coming of Post-Industrial Society, Harmondsworth: Penguin.
  • Benson, A. and Whitworth, A. (2007): “Technology at the Planning Table: Activity theory, negotiation and course management systems”, Journal of Organisational Transformation and Social Change 4/1, 75-92.
  • Benson, A., Lawler, C. and Whitworth, A. (2008): “Rules, roles and tools: Activity theory and the comparative study of e-learning”, British Journal of Educational Technology 39/3, 456-467.
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  • Beynon, J. and Mackay, H., eds (1992): Technological Literacy and the Curriculum, Abingdon: Falmer
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  • Catts, R. and Lau, J. (2008): Towards Information Literacy Indicators, Paris: UNESCO. (provided as a pdf)
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  • Cohill, A. and Kavanaugh, A. (1997): Community Networks: Lessons from Blacksburg, Virginia, Boston: Artech.
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  • Dawkins, R. (1976): The Selfish Gene, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
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  • Dorner, J. (2002): Creative Web Writing, London: A & C Black.
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  • Eccles, R., Griffiths, D., Newton, C. and Tolley, N. (1988): “The effects of menthol isomers on nasal sensation of airflow”, Clinical Otolaryngology 13/1, 25-29.
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  • Engeström, Y., Miettinen, R. and Punamäki, R.-L., eds (1999): Perspectives on Activity Theory, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (provided as a Google book)
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  • Furlan, A., Brosseau, L., Imamura, M. and Irvin, E. (2002): “Massage for low-back pain: A systematic review within the framework of the Cochrane Collaboration Back Review Group”, Spine 27/17, 1896-1910.
  • Garnett, F. (2008): Six ICT literacies, working paper.
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  • Habermas, J. (1984): The Theory of Communicative Action Volume 1: Reason and the Rationalisation of Society: London: Heinemann. ___________ (1987): The Theory of Communicative Action Volume 2: Lifeworld and System—A Critique of Functionalist Reason, Cambridge: Polity. ___________ (1991): New Conservatism: Cultural Criticism and the Historians’ Debate, Cambridge MA: MIT Press. ___________ (1993): Justification and Application: Remarks on Discourse Ethics, Cambridge: Polity.
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