Alex Wood
 
 
   Professor and Director,
Behavioral Science Centre, Stirling Management School,
  
University of Stirling,
   Director, Centre for Graduate Research in Management,
Stirling Management School,
   University of Stirling
,
   Honorary Professor, School of Psychological Sciences and Manchester Centre for Health
   Psychology, University of Manchester.
   Address: 3B54 Cottrell Building, Stirling Management School, University of Stirling,
   Stirling, Scotland, FK9 4LA.
   Centre Website: www.bsciencecentre.com 
E-mail: alex.wood@stir.ac.uk.
Personal About Me

My personal passion is understanding and fostering the good, worthwhile life in myself and others, a joint philosophical, positivistic, and phenomenological endeavor. Historically this was called “happiness”, but it certainly involves more than just the positive moods and feelings of satisfaction that the word now commonly connotes. My research interest is to conduct scientific research into the causes and consequences of happiness for the individual, organization, and society, without regard to disciplinary boundaries. I work in business schools due to; (a) the culture of inter-disciplinary work; (b) the increasing focus within economics on measuring happiness and linking it to fiscal, monetary, and political policy; and; (c) the relevance of happiness (and its resilience) to human resource management and executive education. My teaching passion is to help people understand and progress productively and authentically along the academic career path, through Research Post-Graduate (RPG) education and early career mentoring. Based on my research and teaching passions, my academic service roles are to direct a business school RPG teaching center and a school research center which focuses on integrating psychology, economics, and management research in order to better understand well-being and health outcomes. My leadership philosophy is that academics must be free to choose what to do, as long as this is consistent with the broadest goals of the organization and their formal role, but equally that whatever they chose must be quantified as meeting the highest objective criteria of excellence on whichever metric is most appropriate. I am currently writing two books; the first on understanding happiness (consistent with my personal and research interests) and the second on “success in academia” (consistent with my teaching, service, and leadership passions). My hobbies are spending time with my fantastic group of very growth-orientated Scottish musician friends, and personal development fostered by reading philosophy and classic post-war literature, travel, and being around outstanding natural scenery (through hiking and wild water swimming, including in beautiful Scotland in winter). I also have a weakness for curry.

Formal About Me and Career Summary

Alex is Professor and Director of the Behavioral Science Centre (www.bsciencecentre.com) at Stirling Management School, University of Stirling, which links the behavioural sciences (such as psychology) with the social sciences (such as economics and management) in order to better understand connections between economic, psychological, and health outcomes and their determinants. He was recently awarded an Honorary Chair in Psychology at the University of Manchester and the GSOEP prize for "Best Paper 2012-2013" (with Christopher Boyce) in recognition of his research in this area. One of the youngest full professors in UK history, Alex completed his BSc in Psychology at the University of Leicester in 2005 and a PhD in Psychology at the University of Warwick in 2008. From 2008 he worked in the School of Psychological Sciences, University of Manchester, initially as Lecturer and then Senior Lecturer, before accepting a Chair (full professorship) at the University of Stirling in 2012 when aged 29. In the last 7 years Alex has published over 90 academic papers, been cited over 3,700 times in academic texts (h-index > 30), attracted over £1 million in research funding, and presented 40+ external seminars, skills classes, workshops, and keynote speeches to conferences, other university departments, and industry partners. Alex currently serves on several editorial boards, including the Journal of Research in Personality, having previously been the senior editor of a special issue of Clinical Psychology Review and preformed ad hoc reviewing for over 70 journals, publishers, and funding bodies. His research is regularly covered in over 50 news outlets, including Time Magazine and the Financial Times, and he recently appeared on BBC Radio 4’s “All in the Mind”. His work is being applied in diverse settings including by schools, businesses, and health care providers, and he has provided private business consultancy everywhere from the US to Saudi Arabia. He is passionate about training and mentoring high flying young academics, and he Directs the Centre for Graduate Research in Management, which oversees all aspects of the doctoral training of 80 PhD students across accounting and finance, business and management, economics, and marketing and retail. He has personally supervised PhD dissertations in business, economics, medicine, psychology, and social sciences, and he teaches on his School’s MBA and the MSc in Behavioral Science for Management.

Research

Integrating Economics with Psychology to Understand Well-Being

A huge growth area within mainstream economics involves using people's subjective ratings of their happiness to evaluate the consequences of macro-economic policy and micro-economic individual (e.g., occupational and financial) decision making.
The recognition for the need for this area emerged from the growth of the Nobel Prize winning area of Behavioral Economics, which showed that "utility", what people value, cannot be measured through observed behavior, as this is too dependent on the situation in which people act and their systematically biased cognitive processing. As such, measuring people's utility directly thorough happiness questions becomes preferable. These data are now frequently collected in nationally representative panel surveys, the use of which is now the formal policy of several state organizations (including the Scottish Government and the OECD, both of whom we advise directly). However, by and large "happiness economics" has ignored the vast and relevant psychological literature, resulting in miss-leading conclusions and much reinventing of the wheel. Our research has been instrumental in correcting this deficit, through showing through which psychological mechanisms income relates to well-being, under which psychological situations this relationship occurs, and through showing how appreciating these mechanisms and boundary conditions leads to different policy recommendations. We are also pioneering the linkage of economics with individual difference/personality psychology. The first wave of behavioral economics transformed the field through introducing more realistic models of how people process information in general, through linking with to field of cognitive psychology, a field concerned with generalities. The elephant in the room is that we still have a very poor understanding of specific reactions to economic situations and interventions ("high model heterogeneity"); statistical prediction is poor, and policies that help people in general may systematically harm specific vulnerable groups of people who are readily identifiable through their personality characteristics. We aim to instigate a second wave of behavioral economics, linking with a different and untouched field of psychology, with as much potential to impact on the field as the first. We are generously funded by the UK Economic Research Council (ESRC) to do this and our early papers have enjoyed some considerable success, including the German Socio-Economic Pannel (GSOEP) award for "Best Paper, 2012-2014.

Economics and Subjective Well-Being

Daly, M., Boyce, C. J., & Wood, A. M. (in press). A social rank explanation of how money influence health. Health Psychology.

Hounkpatin, H. O., Wood, A. M., Brown, G. D. A., Dunn, G. (in press). Why does income relate to depressive symptoms? Testing the income rank hypothesis longitudinally. Social Indicators Research.

Boyce, C. J., Wood, A. M., Banks, J., Clarke, A. E., & Brown, G. D. A. (2013). Money, well-being, and loss aversion: Does an income loss have a greater effect on well-being than an equivalent income gain? Psychological Science, 24, 2557-2562. Download.

Boyce, C. J., Wood, A. M., & Powdthavee, N. (2013). Is personality fixed? Personality changes as much as "variable" economic factors and more strongly predicts changes to life satisfaction. Social Indicators Research, 111, 287–305. Download.

Wetherall, K. Daly, M., Robb, K. A., Wood, A. M., & O’Connor, R. C. (in press). Explaining the income and suicidality relationship: Income rank is more strongly associated with suicidal thoughts and attempts than income. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology.

Wood, A. M., Boyce, C. J., Moore, S. C., & Brown, G. D. A. (2012). An evolutionary based social rank explanation of why low income predicts mental distress: A 17 year cohort study of 30,000 people. Journal of Affective Disorders,136, 882-888.
Download.


Boyce, C. J., & Wood, A. M. (2010). Money or mental health: The cost of alleviating psychological distress with monetary compensation versus psychological therapy. Health Economics, Policy and Law, 5, 509-516. Download.

Personality and Economics

Boyce, C. J., Wood, A. M., Daly, M., & Sedikides, C. (in press). Personality change following unemployment. Journal of Applied Psychology.

Boyce, C. J., & Wood, A. M. (2011). Personality prior to disability determines adaptation: Agreeable individuals recover lost life satisfaction faster and more completely. Psychological Science, 22,1397-1402.
Download.


Boyce, C. J., & Wood, A. M. (2011). Personality and the marginal utility of income: Personality interacts with increases in household income to determine life satisfaction. Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 78, 183-191. Download.

Boyce, C. J., & Wood, A., M., & Brown, G. D. A. (2010). The dark side of conscientiousness: Conscientious people experience greater drops in life satisfaction following unemployment. Journal of Research in Personality, 44, 535-539. Download.


The Rank Heuristic: A Contribution to Judgment and Decision Making

This research, consistent with behavioural economics, shows how people's natural ways of processing information can lead to mistakes in applied domains. Most of this research focuses on developing and testing a particular model which states that people never judge the magnitude of a stimuli according to its actual objective size, but rather due to its rank (ordinal) position within a set. Thus; (a) the link between income and health and well-being isn't due to the actual amount a person earns, but rather the rank of their income in their community; (b) people's judgments of the riskiness of their alcohol consumption doesn't depend on how much they drink, but rather how much they (incorrectly) think they drink relative to others'; (b) student's concern about their debt is totally driven by how much they think they owe relative to others; and (c) student satisfaction doesn't depend on the quality of the educational provision, but rather how they incorrectly think the provision ranks amongst what is available elsewhere. We also find similar results with subjective interpretation of physical pain, perceived sufficiency of exercise, judgments of others' personality, emotional reaction to events, and self-labeling with psychiatric conditions. The discovery of basic mechanisms underlying judgment which inform applied decision making is consistent with the mainstream management science approach (as in the final study here), and we show that (social) marketing approaches that can work with people's inherent sensitivity to rank to nudge healthier food purchase and more environmentally friendly behaviour. This research has also been generously funded by the ESRC and test of the social marketing interventions our research indicates are underway.

Aldrovandi, S, Wood, A. M., & Brown, G. D. A. (in press). Social norms and rank-based nudging: Changing willingness to pay for healthy food. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied.

Aldrovandi, S.
, Wood, A. M., Maltby, J., & Brown, G. D. A. (in press). Students' concern about indebtedness: A rank based social norms account. Studies in Higher Education.

Taylor, M. J., Vlaev, I., Maltby, J., Brown, G. D. A., & Wood, A. M. (in press). Improving social norms interventions: Rank-framing increases excessive alcohol drinkers' information-seeking. Health Psychology

Daly, M., Boyce, C. J., & Wood, A. M. (in press). A social rank explanation of how money influence health. Health Psychology.

Brown, G. D. A., Wood, A. M., Ogden, R., & Maltby, J. (2015). Do student evaluations of university reflect inaccurate beliefs or actual experience? A relative rank model. Journal of Behavioral Decision Making. Download. 

Aldrovandi, S., Brown, G. D. A., & Wood, A. M. (2013). Sentencing, severity, and social norms: A rank-based model of contextual influence on judgments of crimes and punishments. Acta Psychologica, 144, 538-547. Download.

Maltby, J., Day, L., Wood, A. M., Pinto, D. G., & Hogan, R. A. (2013). Beliefs in being unlucky and deficits in executive functioning. Consciousness and Cognition, 22, 137-147. Download.

Melrose, K., Brown, G. D. A., & Wood, A. M. (2013). Am I abnormal? Relative rank and social norm effects in judgments of anxiety and depression symptom severity. Journal of Behavioral Decision Making, 26, 174-184. Download.

Watkinson, P., Wood, A. M., Lloyd, D., & Brown, G. D. A. (2013). Pain ratings reflect cognitive context: A range frequency model of pain. Pain, 154, 743-749. Download.

Brown, G. D. A., Wood, A. M., & Chater, N. (2012). Sources of variation within the individual. In P. Hammerstein and J. R. Stevens [Eds], Evolution and Mechanisms of Decision Making (pp. 227-241). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Download.

Maltby, J., Wood, A. M., Vlaev, I., Taylor, M., J., & Brown, G. D. A. (2012). Contextual effects on the perceived health benefits of exercise: The exercise rank hypothesis. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 34, 828-841.

Hounkpatin, H. O, Wood, A. M., Dunn, G., Brown, G. D. A. (in press). Why does income relate to depressive symptoms? Testing the income rank hypothesis longitudinally. Social Indicators Research.

Wood, A. M., Boyce, C. J., Moore, S. C., & Brown, G. D. A. (2012). An evolutionary based social rank explanation of why low income predicts mental distress: A 17 year cohort study of 30,000 people. Journal of Affective Disorders,136, 882-888. Download.

Wood, A. M., Brown, G. D. A., & Maltby, J. (2012). Social norm influences on evaluations of the risks associated with alcohol consumption: Applying the rank based Decision by Sampling model to health judgments. Alcohol and Alcoholism, 47, 57-62.
Download.

Wood, A. M., Brown, G. D. A., Maltby, J., & Watkinson, P. (2012). How are personality judgments made? A cognitive model of reference group effects, personality scale responses, and behavioral reactions. Journal of Personality, 80, 1275-1311.
Download.

Wood, A. M., Brown, G. D. A., & Maltby, J. (2011). Thanks, but I'm used to better: A relative rank model of gratitude. Emotion, 11, 175-180. Download.

Brown, G. D. A., Stewart, N., & Wood, A. M. (2010). Cognitive science and behavioural economics – showing us keys to happiness. In K. Richards (Ed.), The New Optimists (pp. 189-193). Birmingham: Linus Publishing. Download.

Wetherall, K. Daly, M., Robb, K. A., Wood, A. M., & O’Connor, R. C. (in press). Explaining the income and suicidality relationship: Income rank is more strongly associated with suicidal thoughts and attempts than income. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology.

Gratitude

Adam Smith, a founding father of economics, considered gratitude to be central to business, social, and economic transactions through motivating the repayment of aid when there are not other economic or legal incentives to do so. There is, however, almost no research testing this hypothesis. I've conducted some of the first research into individual differences in gratitude, showing that more frequent and intense experience of gratitude in life is strongly, uniquely, and causally related to well-being, and that simple interventions fostering gratitude improve well-being as well or better than mainstream clinical interventions (see especially my review). The "business school" applications of this research include; (a) understanding at the role of gratitude in employee well-being, motivation, and productivity; (b) developing workplace interventions to increase gratitude and help unemployed people return to work; and (c) establishing gratitude as a key behavioral economic concept, through explaining economic decision making as hypothesized by Adam Smith. This research has been generously funded by the US based Templeton Organization.

Wood, A. M. (in press). Gratitude: Appreciating today. In L. Bormans [ed.,], World Book of Hope. Firefly Books.

Froh, J. J., Bono, G., Fan, J., Emmons, R. A., Henderson, K., Harris, C., Leggio, H., & Wood, A. M. (in press). Nice thinking! An educational intervention that teaches children how to think gratefully. School Psychology Review [Special Issue], 43, 132-152. Download.  Commentry

Wood, A. M. (2014). Gratitude. In A. Michalos [ed.], Encyclopedia of Quality of Life Research (pp. 2609-2611). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer. Download.

Wood, A. M., Brown, G. D. A., & Maltby, J. (2011). Thanks, but I'm used to better: A relative rank model of gratitude. Emotion, 11, 175-180. Download.

Geraghty, A. W. A., Wood, A. M., & Hyland, M. E. (2010). Attrition from self-directed interventions: Investigating the relationship between psychological predictors, intervention content and dropout from a body dissatisfaction intervention. Social Science & Medicine, 71, 31-37. Download.

Geraghty, A. W. A., Wood, A. M., & Hyland, M. E. (2010). Dissociating the facets of hope: Agency and pathways predict dropout from unguided self-help therapy in opposite directions. Journal of Research in Personality, 44, 155-158. Download.

Mills, P. J., Redwine, L., Wilson, K., Pung, M., Chinh, K., Greenberg, B. H... Wood, A. M., & Chopra, D. (in press). The role of gratitude in spiritual wellbeing in asymptomatic heart failure patients. Spirituality in Clinical Practice. Download.

Wood, A. M., Froh, J. J, & Geraghty, A. W. A. (2010). Gratitude and well-being: A review and theoretical integration. Clinical Psychology Review, 30, 890-905. Download

Wood, A. M, Joseph, S., Lloyd, J., & Atkins, S. (2009). Gratitude influences sleep through the mechanism of pre-sleep cognitions. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 66, 43-48. Download.

Wood, A. M, Joseph, S., & Maltby, J. (2009). Gratitude predicts psychological well-being above the Big Five facets. Personality and Individual Differences, 46, 443-447. Download.


Wood, A. M., Joseph, S., & Maltby, J. (2008). Gratitude uniquely predicts satisfaction with life: Incremental validity above the domains and facets of the five factor model. Personality and Individual Differences, 45, 49-54. Download.

Wood, A. M., Maltby, J., Gillett, R., Linley, P. A., & Joseph, S. (2008). The role of gratitude in the development of social support, stress, and depression: Two longitudinal studies. Journal of Research in Personality, 42, 854-871. Download.

Wood, A. M., Maltby, J., Stewart, N., Joseph, S. (2008). Conceptualizing gratitude and appreciation as a unitary personality trait. Personality and Individual Differences, 44, 619-630. Download.

Wood, A. M., Maltby, J., Stewart, N., Linley, P. A., & Joseph, S. (2008). A social-cognitive model of trait and state levels of gratitude. Emotion, 8, 281-290.Download.


Wood, A. M., Joseph, S, & Linley, P. A. (2007). Coping style as a psychological resource of grateful people. Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 26, 1076-1093.Download.

Wood, A. M., Joseph, S, & Linley, P. A. (2007). Gratitude - parent of all virtues. The Psychologist, 20, 18-21. Download.


Conceptualizing and Measuring Well-being and Psychological Characteristics

This research area involves improving the measurement and applied use of scales assessing psychological characteristics, such as attitudes, personality, and well-being (including both "happiness" and psychological dysfunction). This involves both developing a theoretical and philosophical understanding of what should be measured and the creation and evaluation of assessment instruments. The basic principles of measurement are the same irrespective of what is being assessed, and increasingly this program is being focusing on informing economics (particularly with the fields increasing interest in well-being) and focusing on designing occupationally relevant scales for use with human resource management and service evaluation. For example, some of my work is currently being used by several health services to evaluate whether their services are meeting patient defined outcomes as discussed here. Research this series has been funded by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC).

Melrose, K., Brown, G. D. A., & Wood, A. M. (2015). When is received social support related to perceived support and well-being? When it is needed. Personality and Individual Differences, 77, 97-105.Download.

Taylor
, P. J., & Wood, A. M. (2014). Psychometric properties and development of the Brief Adolescent Prosocial Perception Scale (BAPPS). Journal of Child and Family Studies, 23,
1417-1429. Download.

Wood, A. M., & Boyce, C. J. (2014). Personality, an overview. In A. Michalos [ed.], Encyclopedia of Quality of Life Research
(pp. 4773-4775). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer. Download.

Joseph, S., Maltby, J., Wood, A. M., Stockton, H., Hunt, N., & Regal, S. (2012). The psychological well-being post-trauma changes questionnaire (PWB-PTCQ): Reliability and Validity. Psychological Trauma, 4, 420-428. Download.

McAllister, M., Wood, A. M., Dunn, G, Shiloh, S., & Todd, C. (2011). The Genetic Counseling Outcome Scale: A new patient reported outcome measure for clinical genetics services. Clinical Genetics, 79, 413-424. Download.

McAllister, M., Wood. A. M., Dunn, G., Shiloh, S., & Todd, C. (2012). The Perceived Personal Control (PPC) Questionnaire: Reliability and validity in a UK sample. American Journal of Medical Genetics: Part A, 158A, 367-372. Download.

Wood, A. M., Linley, P. A., Maltby, J., Kashdan, T. B., & Hurling, R. (2011). Using personal and psychological strengths leads to increases in well-being over time: A longitudinal study and the development of the Strengths Use Questionnaire. Personality and Individual Differences, 50, 15-19.Download.

Joseph, S., & Wood, A. M. (2010). Assessment of positive functioning in clinical psychology: Theoretical and practical issues. Clinical Psychology Review, 30, 830-838. Download.

Smallman, R., Wood, A. M., Maltby, J., Barkus, E., Lewis, S., & Rushe, T. (2010). Invariance testing of the 4-factor solution of schizotypal personality questionnaire across age, sex and ethnicity. Schizophrenia Research, 117, 431.


Colley, A., Maltby, J., Mulhern, G., & Wood, A. M. (2009). The Short Form BSRI: Structure among a United Kingdom sample. Personality and Individual Differences, 46, 384-387. Download.

Linley, P. A, Maltby, J., Wood, A. M., Osborne, G., & Hurling, R. (2009). Measuring happiness: The higher order factor structure of subjective and psychological well-being measures. Personality and Individual Differences, 47, 878-884. Download

Taylor, P., Wood, A. M., Johnson, J., Gooding, P. A., & Tarrier N. (2009). Are defeat and entrapment best defined as a single construct? Personality and Individual Differences, 47, 795-797. Download

Maltby, J., Day, L., Gill, P., Colley, A., & Wood, A. M. (2008). Beliefs around luck: Confirming the empirical conceptualization of beliefs around luck and the development of the Darke and Freedman beliefs around luck scale. Personality and Individual Differences, 45, 655-660. Download.

Wood, A. M., Taylor, P. T., & Joseph, S. (2010). Does the CES-D measure a continuum from depression to happiness? Comparing substantive and artifactual models. Psychiatry Research, 177, 120-123Download.

Wood, A. M., Linley, P. A., Maltby, J., Baliousis, M., & Joseph, S. (2008). The authentic personality: A theoretical and empirical conceptualization, and the development of the Authenticity Scale. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 55, 385-399. Download.

Wood, A. M., & Joseph, S. (2007). Grand theories of personality cannot be integrated. American Psychologist, 62, 57-58.

Mainstream Psychology

As the approach that I bring to economics and the management sciences is grounded in psychology, I continues to conduct basic science research in that field. In particular I research in; (a) clinical psychology (e.g., 1, 2), where much of basic perspectives on personality and well-being originate; (b) child and educational psychology (e.g., 1, 2), where much of my work has a natural impact in the understanding of individual attainment and through informing the design of interventions; (c) and positive psychology (e.g., 1, 2), a field concerned with optimal well-being, to which I take a critical approach.
Research this series has been funded by both the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the Medical Research Council (MRC).

Clinical Psychology

See especially 1, 2   

Siddaway, A. P., Taylor, P. J., Wood, A. M., & Schulz, J. (in press). A meta-analysis of the role of perceptions of defeat and entrapment in depression, anxiety problems, posttraumatic stress disorder and suicidality. Journal of Affective Disorders.

Siddaway, A. P., Wood, A. M., Schulz, J., & Trickey, D. (2015). Evaluation of the CHUMS child bereavement group: A pilot study examining statistical and clinical change. Death Studies, 39, 99-110. Download.

Griffiths, A. W., Wood, A. M., Maltby, J., Taylor, P. J., & Tai, S. (2014). The prospective role of defeat and entrapment in depression and anxiety: A 12-month longitudinal study. Psychiatry Research, 216, 52-59.
Download.

Siddaway, A. P., Wood, A. M., Cartwright-Hatton, S. (2014). Involving parents in cognitive behavioural therapy for child anxiety problems: A case study. Clinical Case Studies, 13, 322-355. Download.

Siddaway, A. P., & Wood, A. M. (2013). Recommendations for conducting mindfulness based cognitive therapy trials. Psychiatry Research, 30, 229-231.
Download.

Johnson, J., Gooding, P. A., Wood, A. M., Fair, K. L., & Tarrier, N. (2013). A therapeutic tool for boosting mood: The broad-minded affective coping procedure (BMAC). Cognitive Therapy and Research, 37, 61-70. Download.

Kelly, R., Mansell, W., Sadhnani, V., & Wood, A. M. (2012). Positive and negative appraisals of the consequences of activated states uniquely relate to symptoms of hypomania and depression. Cognition and Emotion, 26, 899-906. Download.

Kelly, R., Wood, A. M., Shearman, K., Phillips, S., & Mansell, W. (2012). Encouraging acceptance of ambivalence using the expressive writing paradigm. Psychology and Psychotherapy, 85, 220-228.
Link.

Kelly, R., Mansell, W., & Wood, A. M. (in press). Goal conflict and well-being: A review and hierarchical model of goal conflict, ambivalence, self-discrepancy and self-concordance. Personality and Individual Differences.

Higginson, S., Mansell, W., & Wood, A. M. (2011). An integrative mechanistic account of psychological distress, therapeutic change and recovery: The perceptual control theory approach.
Clinical Psychology Review, 31, 249-259.
Download.


Johnson, J., Gooding, P., Wood, A. M., & Tarrier, N. (2011). Trait reappraisal amplifies subjective defeat, sadness and negative affect in response to failure versus success in non-clinical and psychosis populations. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 120, 922-934.Download.

Johnson, J., Wood, A. M., Gooding, P., & Tarrier, N. (2011). Resilience to suicidality: The buffering hypothesis. Clinical Psychology Review, 31, 563-591.Download.

Kelly, R., Mansell, W., & Wood, A. M. (2011). Goal conflict and ambivalence interact to predict depression. Personality and Individual Differences, 50, 531-534. Download.

Kelly, R., Mansell, W., & Wood, A. M., Alatiq, Y., Dodd, A., & Searson, R. (2011). Extreme positive and negative appraisals of activated states interact to discriminate bipolar disorder from unipolar depression and non-clinical controls. Journal of Affective Disorders, 134, 438-444. Download.


Taylor, P. J., Gooding, P., Wood, A. M., & Tarrier, N. (2011). The role of defeat and entrapment in depression, anxiety, and suicide. Psychological Bulletin, 137, 391-420. Download.

Taylor, P. J., Wood, A. M, Gooding, P. A., & Tarrier, N. (2011). Prospective predictors of suicidality: Defeat and entrapment lead to changes in suicidal ideation over time. Suicide and Life Threatening Behaviour, 41, 297-306. Download.


Johnson, J., Gooding, P. A., Wood, A. M., Taylor, P. J., Pratt, D., & Tarrier, N. (2010). Resilience to suicidal ideation in psychosis: Positive self-appraisals buffer the impact of hopelessness. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 48, 883-889. Download.

Johnson, J., Gooding, P. A., Wood, A. M., & Tarrier, N. (2010). Resilience as positive coping appraisals: Testing the schematic appraisals model of suicide. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 48, 179-186. Download.

Taylor, P. J., Awenat, Y., Gooding, P. A.,
Johnson, J., Pratt, D., & Wood, A. M., & Tarrier, N. (2010). The subjective experience of participation in schizophrenia research: A practical and ethical issue. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 198, 343-348. Download.

Taylor, P. J., Gooding, P. A., Wood, A. M., Johnson, J., Pratt, D., & Tarrier, N. (2010). Defeat and entrapment in schizophrenia: The relationship with suicidal ideation and positive psychotic symptoms. Psychiatry Research, 178, 244-248. Download.

Taylor, P. J., Gooding, P. A., Wood, A. M., & Tarrier, N. (2010). Memory specificity as a risk-factor for suicidality in non-affective psychosis: The ability to recall specific autobiographical memories is related to greater suicidality. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 48, 1047-1052.Download

Taylor, P. J, Wood, A. M., Gooding, T., & Tarrier, N. (2010). Appraisals and suicidality: The mediating role of defeat and entrapment. Archives of Suicide Research, 14, 236-247. Download


Wood, A. M., & Joseph, S. (2010). An agenda for the next decade of psychotherapy research and practice. Psychological Medicine, 40, 1055-1056. Download.

Wood, A. M., & Joseph S. (2010). The absence of positive psychological (eudemonic) well-being as a risk factor for depression: A ten year cohort study. Journal of Affective Disorders, 122, 213-217. Download.

Amjad, N., & Wood, A. M. (2009). Identifying and changing the normative beliefs about aggression which lead young Muslim adults to join extremist anti-Semitic groups in Pakistan. Aggressive Behavior, 35, 514-519. Download

Child and Educational Psychology

See especially, 1, 2.

Froh, J. J., Bono, G., Fan, J., Emmons, R. A., Henderson, K., Harris, C., Leggio, H., & Wood, A. M. (in press). Nice thinking! An educational intervention that teaches children how to think gratefully. School Psychology Review [Special Issue], 43, 132-152. Download.

Siddaway, A. P., Wood, A. M., Cartwright-Hatton, S. (in press). Involving parents in cognitive behavioural therapy for child anxiety problems: A case study. Clinical Case Studies.

Taylor, P. J., & Wood, A. M. (2013). Discrepancies in parental and self‐appraisals of prosocial characteristics predict emotional problems in adolescents. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 52, 269-284. Download.

Taylor, P. J., & Wood, A. M. (in press). Psychometric properties and development of the Brief Adolescent Prosocial Perception Scale (BAPPS). Journal of Child and Family Studies.

Proctor, C., Tsukayama, E., Wood, A. M., Maltby, J., Eades, F., & Linley, P. A. (2011). Strengths Gym: The impact of a character strengths-based intervention on the life satisfaction and well-being of adolescent students. Journal of Positive Psychology, 6, 377-388. Download.

Day, L., Hanson, K., Maltby, J., Proctor, C. L., & Wood, A. M. (2010). Hope uniquely predicts objective academic achievement above intelligence, personality, and previous academic achievement. Journal of Research in Personality, 44, 550-553. Download.


Positive Psychology

See especially his review. Many researchers would also classify Alex's work on gratitude (see above section) to fall within this field.

Wood, A. M. & Johnson, J. [Eds.] (in production). Positive Clinical Psychology. New York: Wiley.

Kelly, R., Wood, A. M., & Mansell, W. (2013). Flexible and tenacious goal pursuit lead to improving well-being in an aging population: A ten year cohort study. International Psychogeriatrics, 25, 16-24.

Maltby, J., Wood, A. M., Day, L., & Pinto, D. G. (2012). The position of authenticity within extant models of personality. Personality and Individual Differences, 52, 269-273. Download.

Pinto, D. G., Maltby, J, & Wood, A. M., & Day, L. (2012). A behavioural test of Horney's linkage between authenticity and aggression: People living authentically are less-likely to respond aggressively in unfair situations. Personality and Individual Differences, 52, 41-44. Download.

Pinto, D. G., Maltby, J., & Wood, A. M. (2011). Exploring the tripartite model of authenticity within Gray's approach and inhibition systems and Cloninger's bio-social model of personality. Personality and Individual Differences, 51, 194-197. Download.

Joseph, S., & Wood, A. M. (2010). Assessment of positive functioning in clinical psychology: Theoretical and practical issues. Clinical Psychology Review, 30, 830-838. Download.

Wood, A. M., & Tarrier, N. (2010). Positive Clinical Psychology: A new vision and strategy for integrated research and practice. Clinical Psychology Review, 30, 819-829. Download.

Quoidbach, J., Wood, A. M., & Hansenne, M. (2009). Back to the future: The effect of daily practice of mental time travel into the future on happiness and anxiety. Journal of Positive Psychology, 4, 349-355.


Linley, P. A, Joseph S., Maltby J., Harrington S., & Wood, A. M. (2009). Positive psychology applications. In S. Lopez [Ed], Oxford Handbook of Positive Psychology (pp. 35-49). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Maltby, J., Wood, A. M., Day, L., Kon, T. W. H, Colley, A., & Linley, P. A. (2008). Personality predictors of levels of forgiveness two and a half years after the transgression. Journal of Research in Personality, 42, 1088-1094. Download.

Linley, P. A, Maltby, J., Wood, A. M., Joseph, S., Harrington, S., Peterson, C., Park, N., & Seligman, M. E. P. (2007). Character strengths in the United Kingdom: The VIA Inventory of Strengths. Personality and Individual Differences, 43, 341-351. Download.

Linley, P. A., Joseph, S., Harrington, S., & Wood, A. M. (2006). Positive psychology: Past, present, and (possible) future. Journal of Positive Psychology,1, 3-16. Download
.
External Collaborators
Prof. James Banks (University of Manchester)
Prof. Gordon Brown (University of Warwick)
Prof. Peter Bower (University of Manchester)
Dr Chris Bundy (University of Manchester)
Prof. Rachel Calam (University of Manchester)
Prof. Tarani Chandola (University of Manchester)
Prof. Phillip Corr
(University of East Anglia)
Prof. Graham Dunn (University of Manchester)
Prof. Eamonn Ferguson (University of Nothingham)
Dr Jeff Froh
(Hoffstra University)
Dr Judith Johnson (University of Birmingham)
Prof. Stephen Joseph (University of Nothingham)
Dr Todd Kashdan (George Mason University)
Prof. Alex Linley (Center for Appiled Positive Psychology)
Dr Peter Malinowsky
(Liverpool John Moores University)
Dr John Maltby
(University of Leicester)
Dr Warren Mansell (University of Manchester)
Dr Marrion McAllister
(Cardiff University)
Prof. Paul Mills (University of California, San Diago)
Prof. Lawrence Moore
(Cardiff University)
Dr Simon Moore
(Cardiff University)
Prof. Kevin Munro (University of Manchester)
Dr Simon Murphy
(Cardiff University)
Prof. Nick Powdthavee (London School of Economics)
Dr Laura Redwine (University of California, San Diago)
Dr Jordi Quoidbach
(Harvard University)
Prof. Shoshana Shiloh (Tel Aviv University)
Prof. Constantine Sedikidies (University of Southampton)
Prof. Neil Stewart
(University of Warwick)
Dr Sara Tai
(University of Manchester)
Prof. Nick Tarrier (Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London)
Prof. Chris Todd (University of Manchester)
Dr. Ivo Vlaev (University College London)

Useful Links

These were taken from the Behavioral Science Centre blog and are reproduced here to attract people to that site.The blog is worth monitoring as it includes a wealth of valuable information which is ever growing. Please link to that site not this one. We also maintain a twitter feed commenting on issues in the field. Both were produced and are maintained primarily by Prof Liam Delaney and colleagues at the Behavioral Science Centre.

1) Databased of Nudges

Nudge Database (10 pages; produced by centre member Mark Egan)

1) Collections of Readings


Behavioral Policy Readings

Behavioral Economics and Irish Public Policy

Government and Economists
Book and Journal Club

Readings on the Irish Economy
Social Marketing and Behavioral Economics

Behavioral Economics and E-Commerce

STATA Resources

Resources for microeconometrics

(2) Personality & Economics
 

Personality and Economics

Incorporating Subjective Measures into Economics

(3) Well-being 

Mental Health and the Irish Economy
Measuring diurnal bio-rhythms

Understanding Research Impact

(4) Funding

Research Funding Opportunities Overview

ESRC || Medical Research Council || Nuffield Foundation || Marie Curie Researchers Funding ||
FP7 Ireland || HRB || IRCHSS || SFI || EU Grants || EU Commission || IRCSET || HEA

(5) Online Classes and Learning
Behavioral Economics Courses || Online Resources for Teaching Economics ||
Behavioral Economics TED talks || Open Online Classes

(6) Behavioral Science Centres

Behavioral Science Centre (Stirling, U.K.)

WBS Behavioral Science Group (Warwick, U.K.)

Centre for Decision Research (Leeds, U.K.)

Centre for Behavioral and Experimental Social Science (East Anglia, U.K.)

Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics (Nottingham, U.K.)

UCL Behaviour Change Initiative (London, U.K.)

Behavioral and Experimental Economics (UPF, Barcelona)


Economic Psychology Group (Basel, Switzerland)

Thurgau Institute of Economic (Konstanz, Germany)

Center for Adaptive Rationality (Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Germany) 

Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (Stanford, U.S.)

Harvard Decision Science Lab (Harvard, U.S.)

Center for Decision Research (Chicago Booth, U.S.)

Behavioral Economics and Decision Research Center (Cornell, U.S.)

Center for Behavioral Economics (Duke, U.S.)

Decision Research (Oregon, U.S.)

Center for Behavioral Decision Research (Carnegie Mellon, U.S.)

Interdisciplinary Group in Behavioral Decision Making (UCLA, U.S.)

(6) Online Video Resources